Dawes Arboretum http://dawesarb.org Fri, 21 Nov 2014 13:15:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.5 Small weddings budgets don’t mean “I can’t” http://dawesarb.org/blog/weddings-on-a-budget/ http://dawesarb.org/blog/weddings-on-a-budget/#comments Tue, 11 Nov 2014 15:28:43 +0000 http://dawesarb.org/?p=3268 |  By Sharon Hupp, Events Coordinator  | I have seen so many brides get flustered as to the cost of getting married.  Simple can be so much more majestic and beautiful than the most detailed, ritzy wedding of the century.  Let’s face it; most of us can’t afford to be like Prince William and Duchess […]

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|  By Sharon Hupp, Events Coordinator  |

Untitled-1I have seen so many brides get flustered as to the cost of getting married.  Simple can be so much more majestic and beautiful than the most detailed, ritzy wedding of the century.  Let’s face it; most of us can’t afford to be like Prince William and Duchess Kate.  I have seen and learned over the years at The Arboretum that a really elegant wedding can be done with some elbow grease from the couple, their friends and family paired with some creativity.

If you find yourself not to be the “crafty” type, which I can totally appreciate as my abilities are a little above stick people, Pinterest is a great place to start for ideas as well as wedding websites and blogs.  A lot of the websites will have comment areas from other brides so you can get an idea of the level of difficulty it was to pull a certain look together and pictures to guide you to your own unique look.

One key element to affording what you desire is to start planning early.  Consider venues like The Dawes Arboretum with our stunning vistas where natural decorations are built into the scenery for free.  Many venues will book a year or two in advance with a small down payment.  This will allow you to make payments or perhaps wait until tax time and pay the majority off.  Be aware of deposit and payment policy as some could be non-refundable.

Secondly prepare your budget for each step of the wedding.  Wedding websites provide checklists.  You can use that to setup what you want to do and what you don’t want to do and appropriate funds to each section.

Focus on the one or two things that are truly important to you.  If you have always dreamed of having a Cinderella gown, budget higher in that category—or if distinctive photos mean the world to you, invest in a great photographer with a second shooter.  This is your day to share and show your love to the world and for you to enjoy as a couple.  Make sure what is important to you comes first.

Good caterers can provide excellent food within in a budget.  Be upfront with what your budget and expectations are so they can prepare a custom quote to best fit your needs.  Some caterers will allow you to provide your own beverages as a cost savings.  Check their policies.  Instead of using rented table clothes purchase fabric on sale.  A quick sew on the edges and it will look great!  Round tables work just fine with a square cloth.  A fabric burlap runner with some wild flowers in assorted sized vases with a few candles scattered on the table is simple and such an elegant look.  Have your bridal party and family help you pull this together.

Ask family and friends that have certain skills to help you in an area as their wedding gift to you.  Perhaps there is a baker in the family that can do your wedding cake and thank you favors, maybe you have a crafty aunt that can put together your invitations—hand-made invitations are beautiful and more meaningful.  This year at The Arboretum I have seen fathers building beautiful arbors that can then be transported to the reception for decoration behind the cake, mothers sewing table clothes, cousins and friends playing instruments for the bride to walk the aisle and one groom sing his bride down the aisle.  There was not a dry eye in the garden including mine.

With careful and creative planning you can have the fairy tale wedding you dream about.  Happy planning!

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Name that Plant: ID Instructions Revealed http://dawesarb.org/blog/name-plant-id-instructions-revealed/ http://dawesarb.org/blog/name-plant-id-instructions-revealed/#comments Tue, 23 Sep 2014 19:44:46 +0000 http://dawesarb.org/?p=3196 |  By David Brandenburg, Ph.D  |  Read about some common scenarios and questions we hear about plant and wildflower identification: You’re hiking along a trail and spot a wildflower that you do not recognize, or you are cleaning up a home garden bed and encounter an unfamiliar weed—how can you find out what these plants […]

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|  By David Brandenburg, Ph.D  | 

Read about some common scenarios and questions we hear about plant and wildflower identification:

You’re hiking along a trail and spot a wildflower that you do not recognize, or you are cleaning up a home garden bed and encounter an unfamiliar weed—how can you find out what these plants are without picking them?

Many of us have cell phones that can double as cameras, and—if taken properly—photographs can be used in lieu of actual specimens for identification (ID) purposes.  I stress “properly” because care must be taken to ensure that the digital images contain enough information to identify the plant.

Since you are using photographs to take the place of a physical plant specimen, it is important to take pictures of ALL plant parts that might be needed for the ID process.  I recommend the following format:

(1) an overall view of the plant to show its height and habit (e.g., upright, weeping, sprawling).

(2) a shot of just the flower cluster.

(3) several close-ups of a solitary bloom (the top/front, the side and the bottom).

(4) images of the leaves, including how they are attached to the stem.  If the undersurface of the leaf differs from the upper surface in color or in degree of hairiness, it’s important to document this.

Figure 1

Figure 1

I’ll share an example with you.  In Figure 1 we see a cluster of yellow blooms.  The characteristic combination of petal-like rays arranged in circular fashion around a central disc is a tell-tale sign that this plant is a member of the composite family, also called the daisy family or the sunflower family.  Included in this large group are a great many yellow flowering plants that resemble the one in Figure 1, but the location (central Ohio), time of year (late spring) and habitat (woods) narrow down the possibilities.  See Figure 1

An educated guess is the genus Packera, which is comprised of over four dozen species in North America, but far fewer in Ohio. The three species most common in the central part of the state are butterweed (P. glabella), golden ragwort (P. aurea) and round-leaf ragwort (P. obovata).  The bright yellow flower heads of these three common species are quite similar, and vegetative features are needed to make a proper determination.

Figure 2

Figure 2

This is where photographs of the leaves make all the difference.  The leaves of butterweed (Figure 2) are more or less similar in shape and only gradually reduced in size from the bottom of the plant all the way up to the top.  See Figure 2

In the other two Packera species, the upper stem leaves are much smaller than those on the lower stem; furthermore, the round leaves at the base of the plant are strikingly different from the fernlike stem leaves (Figure 3). See Figure 3

Figure 3

Figure 3

The basal blades of golden ragwort are broadly notched at the point where they attach to the leafstalk (Figure 4).  See Figure 4

In contrast, the base of the basal blades of round-leaf ragwort is not notched. See Figure 5

Whether you are going to look up an unknown plant on your own in a field guide or you are going to e-mail pictures to a botanist, recording lots of visual information with your camera will make the identification process easier and more reliable.  On a final note: take high-resolution digital images!

Figure 4

Figure 4

Figure 5
Figure 5

 

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Why Plant in Fall? Find out Now! http://dawesarb.org/blog/fallplants/ http://dawesarb.org/blog/fallplants/#comments Tue, 09 Sep 2014 20:39:41 +0000 http://dawesarb.org/?p=3173 Fall Plant Sale! Fall Plant Sale! Read all about it!   |  by Megan Fleischer, Display Gardens Manager It’s the time of year that I look forward to most—where a perfect day consists of cool, crisp morning air that slowly warms as the day ages.  Jacket weather.  Football.  Tailgating.  Pumpkin-flavored everything.  It’s fall!  We made […]

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Fall Plant Sale! Fall Plant Sale! Read all about it!  

|  by Megan Fleischer, Display Gardens Manager

It’s the time of year that I look forward to most—where a perfect day consists of cool, crisp morning air that slowly warms as the day ages.  Jacket weather.  Football.  Tailgating.  Pumpkin-flavored everything.  It’s fall!  We made it, gardeners, another summer in the books.  But wait, before you go hanging up your tools and packing away your gloves, let’s talk about the benefits of planting in the fall.australis1

You’re not alone if you’ve held off from planting new plants right before the cold winter months set in.  In fact, it’s a very common question I get at The Arboretum.  However, you may be surprised to hear that a plant can establish itself in the ground by generating just as much new root growth in the fall than plants that were planted in spring of that same year.  These new roots will help to anchor the new plant into the ground—a necessity to prevent the plant from being heaved up out of the soil when the ground freezes.  Plus, fall’s traditionally cooler temperatures coupled with more frequent rainfall makes for ideal growing conditions for your plants.

Now that you have several more weeks of available planting time in your future, let’s talk about our Fall Perennial Plant Sale this Saturday, September 13,  10am – 5pm.

Several of the knock-out native perennials that will be available at our sale include:

  • Aruncus ‘Misty Lace’
  • Amsonia ‘Blue Ice’
  • Eupatorium ‘Phantom’
  • Panicum ‘Blood Brothers’
  • Aster ‘Kickin®Lilac Blue’
  • Baptisia australis
  • Iris versicolor
  • Physostegia ‘Vivid’
  • Heuchera a. ‘Marvelous Marble’
  • Phlox ‘Triple Play’
  • Rudbeckia ‘Goldsturm’
  • Panicum ‘Northwind’

DSC_0101 webIn addition to many more selections of native perennials we will have, be sure to peruse the trees and shrubs (some offered at discounted prices!) we will be showcasing at our sale as well.  Knowledgeable staff will be on hand to answer your gardening questions. We are also thrilled to have the folks at Scioto Gardens (www.sciotogardens.com) back again this year to feature their locally grown stock of native plants.  Hope to see you there!

 

 

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Osa Johnson: The Adventurer and The Arboretum http://dawesarb.org/blog/osa/ http://dawesarb.org/blog/osa/#comments Wed, 13 Aug 2014 18:20:32 +0000 http://dawesarb.org/?p=3130 by Sarah Deffinger, History Intern  | “I am very happy to be able to plant in this beautiful tree-sanctuary a sweet-gum tree, for it has always been my favorite in Africa. . . . And since my heart is in Africa and I am giving you an African tree, I feel that I am leaving […]

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by Sarah Deffinger, History Intern  |

“I am very happy to be able to plant in this beautiful tree-sanctuary a sweet-gum tree, for it has always been my favorite in Africa. . . . And since my heart is in Africa and I am giving you an African tree, I feel that I am Osa Johnson 001leaving part of my heart here.” –Osa Johnson’s Tree Dedication Speech, 11/01/1940

A little foul weather was no match for Osa Johnson. On a rainy November day in 1940, she dedicated a tree at Dawes Arboretum, turning the dirt with a determined grin. Beman Dawes stood by, holding an umbrella to protect her elaborate hat. To a seasoned explorer like Osa, whose usual stomping grounds included the vast plains of Africa and dense jungles of Borneo, the drizzly Newark skies were a minor nuisance.

Born in Chanute, Kansas in 1894, Osa Helen Leighty enjoyed a typical Midwestern childhood. When Martin Johnson traveled through town, lecturing about his South Seas journey with Jack London, Osa was disgusted by his photographs of cannibals and headhunters. Nevertheless, the two married in 1910 (Osa was sixteen; Martin, twenty-six) and immediately took to the road, planning and saving for their first adventure.

Over the course of two decades, Martin and Osa explored the South Pacific Islands, Borneo, and East and Central Africa. Martin, a photographer, wanted to capture on film the rapidly disappearing wildlife and indigenous cultures of these distant regions. The Johnsons prided themselves on producing authentic footage of animal and native life. Their lecture and feature films, photographs, and books were unique and groundbreaking contributions to scientific knowledge, photography, and popular culture. The Johnsons were the first people to film South Pacific Islanders and the first to make a film with sound in Africa. Not content to remain on the ground, they flew 60,000 miles over Africa, taking the first aerial photos of animal herds and Mts. Kenya and Kilimanjaro.

Though initially hesitant, Osa became more than a traveling companion. Again and again, she heard the familiar refrain regarding their destinations: “That’s no place for a woman!” Osa, however, was a essential partner in these expeditions. While Martin rolled the cameras, Osa planned and organized their safaris. She obtained supplies, made travel arrangements, supervised transportation of their extensive cargo, hired native crews, and maintained the camp. She also helped operate the cameras, which often required waiting in a cramped hunting blind from before sunrise until after sunset, hoping to remain undetected by a hungry lion or angry rhinoceros.

Osa also provided meals for the crews by hunting, fishing, and gardening. She became an expert with both a fishing pole and a gun. While traveling, Osa planted familiar plants from home such as Kansas sunflowers, watermelon, and corn, as well as native flowers and tropical fruits. Gardening on a safari presented a unique set of challenges: baboons stole her tomatoes, while elephants enjoyed her sweet potatoes and crushed plants under their massive feet.

Additionally, Osa stood guard while Martin filmed dangerous animals. Often, she could break up a charge by firing a shot into the air. Osa skillfully saved Martin’s life from charging rhino and elephants, as well as attacking lions and leopards. Sometimes Osa killed these animals, but Martin always encouraged her to wait until the last possible moment to pull the trigger. Their goal was to shoot wildlife with cameras, not guns.

Osa JohnsonOsa JohnsonAfter Martin’s death in 1937, Osa continued to lecture and write about her experiences. Some winters, she visited her friends Beman and Bertie Dawes at their Florida home on Jupiter Island. The two women shared many interests, including nature, gardening, fishing, and photography. Osa wrote fond letters to Bertie expressing her desire to “get out and cast a plug or a fly again with my dear beachcomber friend.”  The pair even entered a fishing derby in which a shark snatched Osa’s fish! Undaunted, she went on to reel in a prize catch. Other Dawes family members read Osa’s books with fascination. Beman and Bertie’s grandchildren enjoyed her picture books, and in 1941, Osa dedicated Pantaloons: Adventures of a Baby Elephant to Beman Gates Dawes III.

Osa JohnsonAlthough they began their careers looking for thrills and adventure, Osa and Martin Johnson gradually turned their attention to conservation and education. They strived to create a record of endangered animals, cultures, and landscapes before they vanished under the forces of civilization. In the same spirit as Beman and Bertie Dawes, Osa and Martin wished to increase the public’s knowledge and appreciation of nature, and to encourage the study of the natural world. Today Osa’s tree stands in Dawes Arboretum as a tribute to this shared mission.

 

Photo #1: Osa Johnson dedicates a tree at Dawes Arboretum with the help of Beman Dawes, November 1, 1940.

Photo #2: Osa poses with her gun in this photograph signed “From fisherman to fisherman, Just Osa.” (no date)

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Granville Brewing Company is featured at Ales in the Garden July 26 http://dawesarb.org/blog/ales/ http://dawesarb.org/blog/ales/#comments Fri, 18 Jul 2014 20:41:57 +0000 http://dawesarb.org/?p=3095 by Megan Fleischer, Display Gardens Manager  | On July 26th, The Arboretum is hosting the 2nd Annual Ales in the Garden from 7pm – 9pm.  A unique program partnering The Arboretum with a local brewery, this year we are excited to be featuring Granville Brewing Company.  This evening promises to be a fun mix of plants, food, […]

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gcb logoby Megan Fleischer, Display Gardens Manager  |
On July 26th, The Arboretum is hosting the 2nd Annual Ales in the Garden from 7pm – 9pm.  A unique program partnering The Arboretum with a local brewery, this year we are excited to be featuring Granville Brewing Company.  This evening promises to be a fun mix of plants, food, and libations–you won’t want to miss out!

Enjoy an evening with our Horticulture staff as you take in the beautiful sights of our Azalea Glen. Staff-lead guided tours will spotlight our favorite plants in this garden and the history of this space as it has evolved over the past 85 years.

Don’t be fooled by the name of the Azalea Glen as only having azaleas and rhododendrons within it–a closer look reveals a splendiferous display of colors and ornamental interest from a wide range of plants–there is much to see and learn about!

Known for their Belgian beers, owners Jay Parsons and Ross Kirk from Granville Brewing Company will impress attendees with their enthusiasm and knowledge as you taste these hugely flavorful brews.  I would be remiss if I didn’t briefly mention the light-bites planned for this evening. A menu structured off the flavorful notes of each beer leaves me with one thought: Yum.

ales in the garden tent event

For a program description and to register, click here.  *You must be 21 or over to attend this program*

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Megan’s Secrets from the Garden http://dawesarb.org/blog/megan/ http://dawesarb.org/blog/megan/#comments Tue, 10 Jun 2014 17:26:11 +0000 http://dawesarb.org/?p=2994 by Megan Fleischer, Display Gardens Manager  | We are half-way through the year and many thoughts are running through my mind as we approach summer. With every passing rain storm I wonder if it’s the last one we’ll see for a while. Will I spend most of the summer hand watering plants? Will we have […]

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by Megan Fleischer, Display Gardens Manager  |

daweswood house and gardensWe are half-way through the year and many thoughts are running through my mind as we approach summer. With every passing rain storm I wonder if it’s the last one we’ll see for a while. Will I spend most of the summer hand watering plants? Will we have an extremely hot summer like 2012? (Please, no!) I have to admit, as these thoughts run through my head, I am not only thinking of how these harsh conditions can put stress on our plants, but also how physically and mentally draining a harsh summer can have on a gardener.

With uncertainties about what lies ahead, I am also ready to put to rest one big question that I have been asked this spring: What plants have you lost due to the unseasonably cold winter we had in Ohio? Up until this month I have remained optimistic that the perennials showing little to no life this year might still hit a growth spurt and pull out of dormancy. But, it’s official–they are gone. What took the biggest hit? Lavender. 100% of the lavender I had planted in the gardens at the Daweswood House and Visitors Center did not come back. In years passed, lavender has held onto the majority of it’s leaves, so it shouldn’t have taken me until now to declare them dead, but alas, they were plucked from the ground last week, making it official. With so many great new cultivars in the trade, I am looking forward to replacing the vacant spaces with beauties like Lavender ‘Silver Edge.’ Butterfly bushes were also severely depleted.

Roses are still struggling to pull out of dormancy. Most surprisingly, Knock Out® roses. We were fortunate enough not to lose the plants anchoring one of our gardens, but they are not showing the vigor they have displayed in years prior. I am questioning if I will see flowers on a few of them before the end of summer. Stay tuned…

DSC_0390Although still alive, Yucca has taken a big hit aesthetically. Due to the piles of snow mounded up around our parking lots, the stand of yucca we have bordering one of our lots resemble little trees you’d see in Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax (a stick and then some floppy leaves for a canopy) rather than rigid, shrubby plants.

I am mourning one plant’s return: Canadian thistle. It’s back and worse than ever.

Hopefully, the gardens will continue to flourish despite these challenges!  Make sure to visit frequently this summer to see some new additions to the gardens, as well as long-time favorites.

To learn more about the successes and pitfalls we’ve experienced with the plants in our gardens, attend the First Saturday Wagon Tour on August 2nd at 10am.

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YOUR ARBORETUM SINCE 1929 http://dawesarb.org/blog/85years/ http://dawesarb.org/blog/85years/#comments Fri, 30 May 2014 17:31:54 +0000 http://dawesarb.org/?p=2928 Your support of The Dawes Arboretum is greatly appreciated! Participate in our survey to let us know how we can improve. Founded in 1929 the Dawes family helped initiate some of Ohio’s early research in reforestation on a small farm located just north of the National Road.  Since then, The Dawes Arboretum has grown to become one […]

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kids logYour support of The Dawes Arboretum is greatly appreciated!

Participate in our survey to let us know how we can improve.

Founded in 1929 the Dawes family helped initiate some of Ohio’s early research in reforestation on a small farm located just north of the National Road.  Since then, The Dawes Arboretum has grown to become one of North America’s leading arboreta—and it is in YOUR backyard!

Today, our mission of “Increasing the love and knowledge of trees, history and the natural world” remains strong with more than 20,000 education participants and over 260,000 visitors annually.  Our dedication to conservation continues through educational programs, research and maintaining diverse plant collections and habitats for the public to enjoy.

As a living museum we encompass nearly 2,000 acres of gardens, plant collections, forests, meadows and wetlands provide inspiration, education and beauty for local and national visitors alike.   Your support helps us to restore and maintain critical habitats essential for Ohio River Valley plant species and wildlife.all seasons

Help us preserve and protect our natural world.  Participate in our mission today with a visit to our grounds where you can enjoy our beautiful landscapes, take a class, attend an event or volunteer your time.

The Dawes Arboretum, more than a walk in the park.

—Luke Messinger, Executive Director

 

GET INVOLVED 

As the largest arboretum in the country with no entry fee, we need your commitment to grow.  During The Arboretum’s 85th year, plan a visit, make a donation or give your time and volunteer

The Dawes Arboretum is making a positive impact in our community through horticulture, education and tourism.  Some exciting examples include:

  • Connecting with 260,000 annual visitors as Licking County’s most popular, year-round destination
  • Evaluating 16,000 trees & shrubs for their use in Ohio forests and landscapes
  • Educating more than 20,000 people annually on science and the environment

BECOME A MEMBERplant sale

Membership in The Dawes Arboretum is the best way to keep informed of Arboretum activities and at the same time support our mission of increasing the love and knowledge of trees, history and the natural world.  Whether you are looking to receive regular updates on events, show your support for this wonderful community resource, or benefit from discounts on programming—Arboretum membership is for you!

Become a Member!  

VOLUNTEERchestnuts

Volunteering at The Dawes Arboretum allows you to spend time in a beautiful setting, work alongside professionals, learn about the natural world around you, and socialize with people who share similar interests. There are a tremendous number of opportunities to get involved. For more specific information about opportunities, please contact Suki Christy, at 740.323.2355 or srchristy@dawesarb.org.

Volunteer!  

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Saving the American Chestnut Tree http://dawesarb.org/blog/chestnutproject/ http://dawesarb.org/blog/chestnutproject/#comments Tue, 20 May 2014 18:16:14 +0000 http://dawesarb.org/?p=2836 By Peter Lowe  | A Species Threatened The American chestnut was once a prominent member of the Appalachian hardwood forest; however, in 1904 chestnut blight was introduced to North America with a devastating effect.  Chestnut blight, a fungus imported from Asia, is spread by means of spores in the air, raindrops, or animals and enters […]

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By Peter Lowe  |

chestnut plotA Species Threatened
The American chestnut was once a prominent member of the Appalachian hardwood forest; however, in 1904 chestnut blight was introduced to North America with a devastating effect.  Chestnut blight, a fungus imported from Asia, is spread by means of spores in the air, raindrops, or animals and enters American chestnut trees through a fresh injury in the bark.  The blight kills the vascular cambium of the tree, stemming the flow of nutrients to areas above infection, and eventually kills the tree.  With no genetic material to protect itself, American chestnut populations have quickly began to diminish.

Hope for the American Chestnut Tree
Seeing an immense economic and ecological need to protect these trees from extinction, a group of plant scientists banded together to form The American Chestnut Foundation (TACF).  Founding members Philip Rutter, Dr. David French, and Dr. Charles Burnham developed a backcross breeding program to save the American chestnut by making it more resistant.  The intention was to introduce the genetic resistance of the Chinese chestnut (which evolved with the fungus, developing a natural defense) into the American chestnut without losing any of our native trees’ characteristics.  The process crossed the Chinese and the American chestnuts to produce a progeny that was 50 percent Chinese and 50 percent American.  This tree was then backcrossed with the American species producing a tree that was 75 percent American.  This practice was continued over and over to produce a full strain American chestnut with blight resistance.  These trees are in the testing phase to confirm their resistance.  Currently available and produced by TACF is the 15/16 American chestnut and 1/16 Chinese chestnut.

The Dawes Arboretum’s Chestnut Research Plotchestnuts
In keeping with The Arboretum’s dedication to conservation, we had the privilege of working with TACF in 2012 to grow and install our own chestnut research plot.  In April 2014, The Dawes Arboretum and TACF, along with many volunteers, teamed up again to expand the chestnut plot by installing 450 American chestnut seedlings in our research plot.  As we continue collaborating with others in conservation, as well as researching these trees, we are able to help preserve this staple of our woodlands.

The Mission of The American Chestnut Foundation
“The goal of TACF is to restore the American chestnut tree to our eastern woodlands to benefit our environment, our wildlife, and our society.  The American Chestnut Foundation is restoring a species – and in the process, creating a template for restoration of other tree and plant species.”

The importance of preserving this staple of our woodlands extends beyond an environmental impact, but also has an economic impact on the agriculture and timber industries.  Be part of the conservation plan to help save an important piece of our natural environment, the American chestnut tree.  To provide donations to this project or others, contact development@dawesarb.org or call 800.44.DAWES (32937).

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Plant Sale Sneak Peek! http://dawesarb.org/blog/plantsale2014/ http://dawesarb.org/blog/plantsale2014/#comments Thu, 08 May 2014 18:48:43 +0000 http://dawesarb.org/?p=2815 by Mike Ecker, Director of Horticulture  |   Plant Sale & Garden Fair will soon be here and Arboretum staff are already prepping and planning for the sale happening May 17.  Each year we continue to update and improve our offerings and it always seems to end successfully… more, I suspect, from dedicated buyers and […]

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by Mike Ecker, Director of Horticulture  |  fall plant sale long

Plant Sale & Garden Fair will soon be here and Arboretum staff are already prepping and planning for the sale happening May 17.  Each year we continue to update and improve our offerings and it always seems to end successfully… more, I suspect, from dedicated buyers and diversity offered than by any magic on our part.  And lots of diversity this year!  Too much to list them all in a blog, but a few highlights for which I have a special affinity:

First, evergreens – upright white fir, Abies concolor ’Pyramidalis’ high on my list with one in my landscape. How it has avoided becoming someone’s Christmas tree, I don’t know.  Blue, upright, tightly congested foliage and fast-growing. A real vertical accent that looks great by itself or with other conifers.  Other evergreens I’ve found a site for in my garden: Gold Spangle sawara false cypress, a bright yellow, broadly conical form acting as exclamation in the border and a visual screen for my three-season porch; Beanpole Anglo-Japanese yew performing just as the name describes – another vertical accent, only dark green.  Even though not evergreen, at this time I may as well mention hybrid Rhododendron periclymenoides x R. prinophyllumalso in my garden.  Pink flowers with intense fragrance of wild phlox that I can’t walk by without stopping to enjoy.

Another special plant offered this year never failing to wow those with a botanical affinity: dwarf European hornbeam, Carpinus betulus ’Columnaris Nana’ is a very compact, dense, slow-growing tree that works well aesculus flava5with conifers because of its conical shape.  Looks sheared without ever having been touched by pruners!

How about buckeyes?  red flowers Aesculus pavia, yellow flowers A. flava, greenish white flowers A. glabra Ohio buckeye (not the best ornamental tree, but hey, we’re Buckeyes!)

Lots of evergreens – bun-like dwarf mounds like Pine Glenn Norway spruce, Eagle Rock white spruce, Guldemond’s Dwarf eastern hemlock.  First two are miniature, hemlock is compact – 20 year-old plant only about 6′ tall and wide.  Again, no pruning! Have you ever admired the large Pinus densiflora ‘Oculus-draconis’, dragon’s-eye Japanese red pine, near Dawes Lake?  Now’s your chance to nab one at this sale and put a bright yellow pinus densiflora 'Oculus-draconis'2and green banded pine in your front yard.  Won’t the neighbors be jealous?

Or perhaps you’re attracted to maples – Japanese maples ‘Trompenburg’ with dark purple-red foliage all summer, ‘Ryusen’ one of few, true weeping maples, or hornbeam maple (Acer carpinifolium - name describes leaves resembling hornbeam Carpinus - great for stumping “plant know-it-alls” trying to guess what it is).  Sure doesn’t look like a maple at first glance.

A few flowering shrubs are a double blooming rhododendron ‘Autumn violet’; beach plum, Prunus maritima, which I’ve enjoyed covered in white flowers (the shrub not me), then the excellent tasting fruit in late summer; ‘Ruby Spice’ summersweet, a 6′ deciduous shrub with late, fragrant, butterfly attracting dark pink flower spikes.

And how could I leave out dogwoods?  Vigorous ‘Summer Fun’ kousa dogwood with white and green foliage in summer, pink and red in fall, or kousa ‘Wolf Eyes,’ a cornus kousa 'Summer Fun'2challenging plant to establish but well worth the effort.

Be sure to peruse the Plant Sale Inventory List & hope to see you at the Sale!  For more information click here.

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Visit the Brand New History Center… with Exhibits! http://dawesarb.org/blog/visit-brand-new-history-center-exhibits/ http://dawesarb.org/blog/visit-brand-new-history-center-exhibits/#comments Tue, 22 Apr 2014 21:02:20 +0000 http://dawesarb.org/?p=2791 By Leslie Wagner, Historian The History Center has been an ever-changing space in The Dawes Arboretum’s history.  A garage for the Dawes family, the headquarters of the History department, and now a space to showcase our artifacts and archival materials.  The building is dedicated to C. Burr Dawes, son of the founders and the Arboretum’s […]

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By Leslie Wagner, Historian

The History Center has been an ever-changing space in The Dawes Arboretum’s history.  A garage for the Dawes family, the headquarters of the History department, and now a space to showcase our artifacts and archival materials.  The building is dedicated to C. Burr Dawes, son of the founders and the Arboretum’s first Historian.  Opening on our Arbor Day celebration, the History Center features four different exhibits focusing on the history of the Arboretum, our founders Beman and Bertie Dawes, the Arboretum’s Tree Dedicators and The Pure Oil Company.  How is Pure Oil at all related to The Dawes Arboretum?  Come and find out!pure oil truck

When I had the task to reinvent this former garage to a mini-museum, I quickly called upon my past work experience in museums to know what problems needed to be addressed.  We had old carpeting, fading from sunlight, limited temperature and humidity control and inadequate interior lighting.  With help from staff and outside contractors, the carpet was ripped out, walls repainted, a new A/C unit installed, and LED lights put in to replace the fluorescent bulbs.

Another update included using new window films to keep ultraviolet light out of the space.  The words, “no sunlight” are a tough sell to an arboretum which grows acres of beautiful plants by relying on photosynthesis!  However, UV rays from the sun, as well as fluorescent lighting, have a damaging affect: these light sources bleach out and break down textiles, artwork and paper documents.  In order to protect the condition of our artifacts, the sunlight had to be minimized in the space.

I had the pleasure of locating all the artifacts I wanted to display by using our collections database software.  This includes objects, historic photographs and documents from our Archives and Daweswood House Museum.  I also reclaimed our Pure Oil artifacts that were on loan to The Works.

Tree DedicationHow was I going to display each artifact?  Cabinets and accessories were chosen for specific display intentions, depending on subject matter and artifact type.  Next was writing the text panels and labels.  This research involved a lot of digging through our primary documents saved either from our founders or staff.  Once everything was gathered together, a small group of staff assisted with the exhibit installation.

The History Center only features these displays for six months because our artifacts need to be taken out and preserved for their longevity in a cool, dry, dark place – otherwise known as the Archives Building.

The History Department honors Beman’s request for The Dawes Arboretum to increase the love and knowledge of trees, history and the natural world.  The History Center is open for the public on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays from 12-3 beginning in May.

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